Personal Growth

Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

The Science of Generosity

"Perhaps the strongest message from the science of generosity is that the more adversity someone has experienced, the more compassion she feels and the more generous she’s likely to be. I’m reminded of this every time I see someone who looks destitute drop a few coins into a panhandler’s cup while expensively dressed commuters rush past... Someone who knows what it is to suffer also knows how outside forces can land one in deep poverty through little fault of one’s own, and how wonderful it can be to have a dollar for a McDonald’s coffee." [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

What the Experience of Awe Does for Us

“Awe gives you an existential shock. You realize that you are hardwired to be a little selfish, but you are also dependent on something bigger than yourself... Robert Leahy, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist...sees awe as a cousin to appreciation and gratitude, and links these to the experiences often found in places of worship, where architecture, music, and prayer conspire to draw attendees outside of themselves..."[Read Article]

Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Why Being Too Self-Conscious Will Make You Less Happy

"In study after study, experimental subjects thought that other people would notice them much more than they actually did... This [is] the 'spotlight effect.' We are naturally conscious of ourselves, what we are thinking, how we look, and what we are doing. As David Foster Wallace put it, 'There is no experience you’ve had that you were not at the absolute center of.' And so it’s hard to block the inference that others share this focus. But research finds that they don’t..." [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Study Suggests Simple Method for Leaving Work at the Office

"...those with uncompleted goals reported more intrusive thoughts about work when they were home at the end of the day. To help prevent this, participants, once they'd described their incomplete goals, were asked to clearly plan where, when and how they would tackle each one... This helped the high-involved participants to put the goals out of mind during off-work hours, and as a result their uncompleted goals produced fewer intrusions, almost as if they had the same status as completed goals." [Read Article]