Mental Health

Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Whatever Happened to Melancholy?

"Everywhere you look these days you see something on how to be happy — how to manifest abundance, desires and success, find your bliss... Whatever happened to experiencing the grace of melancholy, which requires reflection: a sort of mental steeping, like tea? What if all this cheerful advice only makes you feel inadequate? What if you were born morose?" [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Changing the Way We See Depression

"I was inspired by a quote by Saint Teresa of Avila where she said 'The pain is still there. It bothers me so little now I feel my soul is served by it.' I interpreted that to mean that if God is in everything we should be able to find Him in all states... We may not all get to the point where we see ecstasy in depression, but deepening our understanding can help all of us to remove suffering and increase functionality... [A] deeper understanding can be the difference between life and death." [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Is the Mental Illness Epidemic Real?

"According to one study, about 50 percent of Americans will meet the criteria for at least one mental illness... within their lifetimes. That’s a stunning number—and one that more than a few experts view skeptically... This does not mean that all concerns about mental illness are overblown—the problem is a misplaced use of resources, as non-illnesses become overdiagnosed, and more serious illnesses are left untreated." [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Autism’s Vital Role in Shaping Human History

"Neurotribes started as an investigation into the prevalence of autism within the tech bubble of Silicon Valley... While acknowledging the very real challenges of the condition, author Steve Silberman argues strongly against the notion of autism as some 'modern plague.' Instead, he questions who are we to decide which type of minds should be considered as normal?" [Read Article]
Mind & Spirit - Daily Read

Are You a Good or Bad Perfectionist? Take this Test and See.

"A body of research suggests a healthy way to be a perfectionist, that lets you reap the good associated with it — as in, chasing after the ridiculously high goals you’ve set for yourself — while neatly sidestepping the nasty self-loathing should you happen to miss your mark, and the anxiety that prevents you from ever embarking on those goals in the first place." [Read Article]